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Dorrough v. Colvin

United States District Court, Tenth Circuit

September 4, 2013

EDSEL DORROUGH, Plaintiff,
v.
CAROLYN W. COLVIN, [1]Acting Commissioner of Social Security, Defendant.

MEMORANDUM AND ORDER

John W. Lungstrum, United States District Judge

Plaintiff seeks review of a decision of the Commissioner of Social Security (hereinafter Commissioner) denying Social Security Disability(SSD) benefits and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits under sections 216(i), 223, 1602, and 1614(a)(3)(A) of the Social Security Act. 42 U.S.C. §§ 416(i), 423, 1381a, and 1382c(a)(3)(A) (hereinafter the Act). Finding no error in the Commissioner’s final decision, the court ORDERS that judgment shall be entered pursuant to the fourth sentence of 42 U.S.C. § 405(g) AFFIRMING that decision.

I. Background

Plaintiff applied for SSD and SSI on September 12, 2008, alleging disability beginning July 2, 2008. (R. 21, 131-38). The applications were denied initially and upon reconsideration, and Plaintiff requested a hearing before an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ). (R. 21, 70-73, 90-91). Plaintiff’s request was granted, and Plaintiff appeared with counsel for a hearing before ALJ Michael D. Shilling on August 25, 2010. (R. 21, 37-38). At the hearing, testimony was taken from Plaintiff and from a vocational expert. (R. 21, 37-69). ALJ Shilling issued his decision on September 23, 2010 finding that although Plaintiff has severe impairments which prevent performance of his past relevant work; including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine, scoliosis, hypothyroidism, affective mood disorder, and anxiety related disorder; there are jobs that exist in significant numbers in the economy that Plaintiff can perform, and therefore, he is not disabled within the meaning of the Act. (R. 21-31). Consequently, the ALJ denied Plaintiff’s applications for benefits. (R. 31).

Plaintiff requested review of the ALJ’s decision by the Appeals Council and submitted additional medical evidence for the Council’s consideration. (R. 14-17, 516-755). The Appeals Council received the additional evidence and made it a part of the administrative record in this case. (R. 5). The Council considered the additional evidence but found that it does not provide a basis for changing the ALJ’s decision. (R. 1). It found no reason under the rules of the Social Security Administration to review the decision, and denied Plaintiff’s request for review. (R. 1). Therefore, the ALJ’s decision became the final decision of the Commissioner; (R. 1); Blea v. Barnhart, 466 F.3d 903, 908 (10th Cir. 2006); and Plaintiff now seeks judicial review of that decision. (Doc. 1).

II. Legal Standard

The court’s jurisdiction and review are guided by the Act. Weinberger v. Salfi, 422 U.S. 749, 763 (1975) (citing 42 U.S.C. § 405(g)); Wall v. Astrue, 561 F.3d 1048, 1052 (10th Cir. 2009) (same); Brandtner v. Dep’t of Health and Human Servs., 150 F.3d 1306, 1307 (10th Cir. 1998) (sole jurisdictional basis in social security cases is 42 U.S.C. § 405(g)). Section 405(g) of the Act provides for review of a final decision of the Commissioner made after a hearing in which the plaintiff was a party. It also provides that in judicial review “[t]he findings of the Commissioner as to any fact, if supported by substantial evidence, shall be conclusive.” 42 U.S.C. § 405(g). The court must determine whether the ALJ’s factual findings are supported by substantial evidence in the record and whether she applied the correct legal standard. Lax v. Astrue, 489 F.3d 1080, 1084 (10th Cir. 2007); accord, White v. Barnhart, 287 F.3d 903, 905 (10th Cir. 2001). Substantial evidence is more than a scintilla, but it is less than a preponderance; it is such evidence as a reasonable mind might accept to support a conclusion. Richardson v. Perales, 402 U.S. 389, 401 (1971); Wall, 561 F.3d at 1052; Gossett v. Bowen, 862 F.2d 802, 804 (10th Cir. 1988). The court may “neither reweigh the evidence nor substitute [its] judgment for that of the agency.” Bowman v. Astrue, 511 F.3d 1270, 1272 (10th Cir. 2008) (quoting Casias v. Sec’y of Health & Human Servs., 933 F.2d 799, 800 (10th Cir. 1991)); accord, Hackett v. Barnhart, 395 F.3d 1168, 1172 (10th Cir. 2005).

When deciding if substantial evidence supports the ALJ’s decision, the mere fact that there is evidence in the record which might support a contrary finding will not establish error in the ALJ’s determination. “The possibility of drawing two inconsistent conclusions from the evidence does not prevent an administrative agency’s findings from being supported by substantial evidence. [The court] may not displace the agency’s choice between two fairly conflicting views, even though the court would justifiably have made a different choice had the matter been before it de novo.” Lax, 489 F.3d at 1084 (citations, quotations, and bracket omitted); see also, Consolo v. Fed. Maritime Comm’n, 383 U.S. 607, 620 (1966) (defining substantial evidence as “such relevant evidence as a reasonable mind might accept as adequate to support a conclusion, ” and noting that “the possibility of drawing two inconsistent conclusions from the evidence does not prevent an administrative agency’s finding from being supported by substantial evidence.”). Moreover, the determination whether substantial evidence supports the Commissioner’s decision is not simply a quantitative exercise, for evidence is not substantial if it is overwhelmed by other evidence or if it constitutes mere conclusion. Gossett, 862 F.2d at 804-05; Ray v. Bowen, 865 F.2d 222, 224 (10th Cir. 1989).

An individual is disabled only if he can establish that he has a physical or mental impairment which prevents him from engaging in any substantial gainful activity, and which is expected to result in death or to last for a continuous period of at least twelve months. Knipe v. Heckler, 755 F.2d 141, 145 (10th Cir. 1985) (quoting identical definitions of a disabled individual from both 42 U.S.C. §§ 423(d)(1) and 1382c(a)(3)(A)); accord, Lax, 489 F.3d at 1084. The claimant’s impairments must be of such severity that he is not only unable to perform his past relevant work, but cannot, considering his age, education, and work experience, engage in any other substantial gainful work existing in the national economy. 42 U.S.C. § 423(d)(2)(A).

The Commissioner uses a five-step sequential process to evaluate disability. 20 C.F.R. §§ 404.1520, 416.920 (2010);[2] Wilson v. Astrue, 602 F.3d 1136, 1139 (10th Cir. 2010) (citing Williams v. Bowen, 844 F.2d 748, 750 (10th Cir. 1988)). “If a determination can be made at any of the steps that a claimant is or is not disabled, evaluation under a subsequent step is not necessary.” Wilson, 602 F.3d at 1139 (quoting Lax, 489 F.3d at 1084). In the first three steps, the Commissioner determines whether claimant has engaged in substantial gainful activity since the alleged onset, whether he has a severe impairment(s), and whether the severity of his impairment(s) meets or equals the severity of any impairment in the Listing of Impairments (20 C.F.R., Pt. 404, Subpt. P, App. 1). Williams, 844 F.2d at 750-51. After evaluating step three, the Commissioner assesses claimant’s RFC. 20 C.F.R. §§ 404.1520(e), 416.920(e). This assessment is used at both step four and step five of the sequential evaluation process. Id.

The Commissioner next evaluates steps four and five of the sequential process--determining at step four whether, in light of the RFC assessed, claimant can perform his past relevant work; and at step five whether, when also considering the vocational factors of age, education, and work experience, claimant is able to perform other work in the economy. Wilson, 602 F.3d at 1139 (quoting Lax, 489 F.3d at 1084). In steps one through four the burden is on Plaintiff to prove a disability that prevents performance of past relevant work. Blea, 466 F.3d 903, 907 (10th Cir. 2006); accord, Dikeman v. Halter, 245 F.3d 1182, 1184 (10th Cir. 2001); Williams, 844 F.2d at 751 n.2. At step five, the burden shifts to the Commissioner to show that there are jobs in the economy which are within the RFC assessed. Id.; Haddock v. Apfel, 196 F.3d 1084, 1088 (10th Cir. 1999).

Plaintiff makes three arguments, each claiming error in one aspect of the ALJ’s credibility determination. First, he claims that the ALJ used improper boilerplate findings in evaluating Plaintiff’s activities of daily living. He then claims the ALJ relied upon Plaintiff’s failure to pursue or to follow prescribed treatment, but failed to apply the factors recognized by the court in Frey v. Bowen, 816, F.2d 508, 517 (10th Cir. 1987) (the Frey test). Finally, Plaintiff claims the ALJ provided insufficient analysis regarding the lay opinion of Plaintiff’s wife regarding Plaintiff’s limitations.

The Commissioner responds to each claim. She argues that the ALJ properly considered Plaintiff’s daily activities as but one factor in his credibility determination and properly explained the rationale supporting his analysis. She argues that the ALJ did not use a failure to pursue or to follow prescribed treatment as a basis to find Plaintiff’s allegations incredible, but rather used the inconsistency between Plaintiff’s allegation that he could not afford continued mental health treatment and his apparent ability to continue to purchase cigarettes. In the alternative, the Commissioner argues that even if it was error not to consider the Frey test, the error is harmless “because the ALJ considered the entire record, set forth the specific evidence upon which he relied, and based his determination on substantial evidence in the record.” (Comm’r Br. 10). Finally, the Commissioner argues that the ALJ properly considered the opinion of Plaintiff’s wife, and explained his reasons for discounting it. Because the court’s review of the Commissioner’s credibility determination is deferential, the court finds no error in the decision at issue.

III. Analysis

A. Standard for Evaluating the ALJ’s Credibility Determination

An ALJ’s credibility determinations are generally treated as binding on review. Talley v. Sullivan, 908 F.2d 585, 587 (10th Cir. 1990); Broadbent v. Harris, 698 F.2d 407, 413 (10th Cir. 1983). “Credibility determinations are peculiarly the province of the finder of fact” and will not be overturned when supported by substantial evidence. Wilson, 602 F.3d at 1144; accord Hackett, 395 F.3d at 1173. Therefore, in reviewing the ALJ’s credibility determinations, the court will usually defer to the ALJ on matters involving witness credibility. Glass v. Shalala, 43 F.3d 1392, 1395 (10th Cir. 1994); but see Thompson v. Sullivan, 987 F.2d 1482, 1490 (10th Cir. 1993) (“deference is not an absolute rule”). “However, ‘[f]indings as to credibility should be closely and affirmatively linked ...


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